[D]uring my employment in hospitals, something changed. At that time, some states had approved abortion laws that I wasn’t even aware of. Because of those laws, when I was in college I witnessed the results of two abortions. …

The memory haunts me. I will never forget that I stood witness to acts of unspeakable brutality. In the abortions I witnessed, powerful people made decisions that ended the lives of small, powerless, children. Through lies and manipulation, children were seen as objects. Women and families were convinced that ending a life would be painless, and forgettable. Experts made seemingly convincing arguments that the unborn were not people at all, that they could not feel pain, and were better off dead.

I witnessed the death of two small people who never had the chance to take a breath. I can never forget that. And I have never been the same. My faith was weak at the time. But I knew by reason, and by what I saw, that a human life was destroyed. My conscience awakened to the truth of the dignity of the human being from the moment of conception. I became pro-life and eventually returned to my faith.

I learned what human dignity was when I saw it callously disregarded. I know, without a doubt, that abortion is a violent act of murder and exploitation. And I know that our responsibility is to work and pray without ceasing for its end.

Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila

Read more about what bishops have to say about the 40th anniversary of Roe v. Wade.

(via osvnews)

(via heartlessmuffineater)

I’ve often thought that if an invading army ever wanted to discreetly invade the capitol they should just hold up pro-life signs and they’d be absolutely ignored.

Matthew Archibold 

Someone should take bets on whether the major media outlets will either a) totally ignore the March, or b) find those four people with a “pro-choice” sign and pretend they were the whole rally. Both time-honored strategies of our unbiased, truth-seeking, fact-based media.

(via badwolfcomplex)

(via heartlessmuffineater)

None of us could have foreseen, in those days, that the right-to-life issue would become the cultural marker of serious Catholicism in America or that it would give birth to a whole new ecumenism with evangelical Protestants. Yet both have happened, and both are great graces, even amidst the unending sorrow of the abortion license and what it has done to children, women, families, men and American public life. George Weigel (via badwolfcomplex)

(via heartlessmuffineater)

spiritual-maternity:

She chose life…

spiritual-maternity:

She chose life…

Here’s how Miller describes the scene:

“I could see dozens and dozens of boxes strewn haphazardly about the dock. When we reached the loading dock, I knelt by a stack of boxes. Pulling back the flaps of one, I saw that it was filled to the top with the bodies of aborted babies. There were literally hundreds of them. Each box was similarly filled with fetal remains. I was struck by the realization that all of these fetal children had been alive only a few short days ago. Now they lay dead and abandoned, cut from their mothers’ wombs, cut from the human race: corpses of fetal bodies stacked on a loading dock inside an industrial park in boxes marked ‘for disposal.’”

One might question some of the things Miller did, like her sit-ins. Some people might think her rummaging through abortion business “trash” weird, if not revolting. But the corporal works of mercy include burying the dead, and perhaps in our day that means those who are not even deemed persons. Consider that when Milwaukee pro-life activists organized a collective burial for the bodies of retrieved babies — enough to fill six coffins — a bystander “asked one of the police escorts, ‘Who died?’ The policeman shook his head and answered, ‘No one.’”
— Book Review: Abandoned: The Untold Story of the Abortion Wars by Monica Migliorino Miller (via badwolfcomplex)

(via heartlessmuffineater)

Nothing we do to defend the human person, no matter how small, is ever unfruitful or forgotten. Our actions touch other lives and move other hearts in ways we can never fully understand in this world. Don’t ever underestimate the beauty and power of the witness you give in your pro-life work. — Archbishop Charles Chaput (via abolishabortion)

(via emilye)

Bl. Mother Teresa of Calcutta, pray for us and for the end of abortion.

exfidefiducia:

gmarytherese:

ragingcommonsense:

leftybegone:

I’d be sad, but I wouldn’t be a murderer.

That anon basically described what happened to my parents.
My big sister was born with just enough brain matter for her body to function on the most basic levels. She was born deaf, blind, and screamed 18 hours a day almost every single day for the first 1 & 1/2 - 2 years of her life.
The doctors kept telling my parents my sister would die; in a day, a week, a month, a year.
She lived to be almost 17 years old. By ten years old she had 20/20 vision, she could hear perfectly by the time she was 4, she stopped screaming suddenly one day when my dad cried so hard his tears pelted her face. It was the first time she smiled; when she felt his tears for his first born daughter. 
My sister never walked, but we loved her with every fiber of our being. If my sister never existed, I wouldn’t be who I am today. My sister made hundreds of people fall in love with her, and God knows how many lives she turned around because she was so loving to every person she met.
There were so many people at her funeral it was standing room only. Our funeral procession stretched as far as I could see.
My parents dealt very well with the loss of their daughter after several years. To this day, through myself and my dad’s book, my sister is still touching lives with her boundless love; and we always think of her with a smile on our face because we miss her so much.
So anon, what the hell is your damn point?

Wow (:

exfidefiducia:

gmarytherese:

ragingcommonsense:

leftybegone:

I’d be sad, but I wouldn’t be a murderer.

That anon basically described what happened to my parents.

My big sister was born with just enough brain matter for her body to function on the most basic levels. She was born deaf, blind, and screamed 18 hours a day almost every single day for the first 1 & 1/2 - 2 years of her life.

The doctors kept telling my parents my sister would die; in a day, a week, a month, a year.

She lived to be almost 17 years old. By ten years old she had 20/20 vision, she could hear perfectly by the time she was 4, she stopped screaming suddenly one day when my dad cried so hard his tears pelted her face. It was the first time she smiled; when she felt his tears for his first born daughter. 

My sister never walked, but we loved her with every fiber of our being. If my sister never existed, I wouldn’t be who I am today. My sister made hundreds of people fall in love with her, and God knows how many lives she turned around because she was so loving to every person she met.

There were so many people at her funeral it was standing room only. Our funeral procession stretched as far as I could see.

My parents dealt very well with the loss of their daughter after several years. To this day, through myself and my dad’s book, my sister is still touching lives with her boundless love; and we always think of her with a smile on our face because we miss her so much.

So anon, what the hell is your damn point?

Wow (:

(via heartlessmuffineater)

Can a nation conceived in liberty carry its head high if it denies protection to the youngest and most vulnerable of its citizens? — Senator Paul Rand (via katentz)

(via emilye)

Heavenly Father, You create men in Your own image, and You desire that not even the least among us should perish.In Your love for us, You entrusted Your only Son to the holy Virgin Mary. Now, in Your Love,protect against he wickedness of the devil,those little ones to whom You have given the gift of life. Amen.

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