signum-crucis:

Can you expect to go to Heaven for nothing? Did not our dear Saviour track the whole way to it with His Blood and tears?
—St Elizabeth Ann Seton

signum-crucis:

Can you expect to go to Heaven for nothing? Did not our dear Saviour track the whole way to it with His Blood and tears?

—St Elizabeth Ann Seton

signum-crucis:

Jesus in Your Heart We Find
Jesus, in your heart we findlove of the Father and mankindthese two loves to us impart -Divine love in a human heart.
May we stand within the fireOf your Sacred Heart, and raiseTo our God in joyful choirAll creation’s song of praise.
In our hearts from roots of prideDeadly growths of evil flower;But from Jesus’ wounded sideStreams the sacramental power.
To the depths within your heartDraw us with divine desire,Hide us, heal us, and impartYour own love’s transforming fire.
James P. McAuley (1917-1976)
——
James Phillip McAuley (12 October 1917 – 15 October 1976) was an Australian academic, poet, journalist, literary critic and a prominent convert to Roman Catholicism.

signum-crucis:

Jesus in Your Heart We Find

Jesus, in your heart we find
love of the Father and mankind
these two loves to us impart -
Divine love in a human heart.

May we stand within the fire
Of your Sacred Heart, and raise
To our God in joyful choir
All creation’s song of praise.

In our hearts from roots of pride
Deadly growths of evil flower;
But from Jesus’ wounded side
Streams the sacramental power.

To the depths within your heart
Draw us with divine desire,
Hide us, heal us, and impart
Your own love’s transforming fire.

James P. McAuley (1917-1976)

——

James Phillip McAuley (12 October 1917 – 15 October 1976) was an Australian academic, poet, journalist, literary critic and a prominent convert to Roman Catholicism.

signum-crucis:

awodeji:

awodeji:

Sts. Gabriel, Aloysius, Thérèse of Lisieux, and Faustina may we follow your example, pray for us!

Currently being a major help in my life.

It is good to venerate the crucifix. But even better than images of wood or stone are living images, souls formed in the image of Christ. —Edith Stein, St Teresa Benedicta of the Cross

signum-crucis:

awodeji:

awodeji:

Sts. Gabriel, Aloysius, Thérèse of Lisieux, and Faustina may we follow your example, pray for us!

Currently being a major help in my life.

It is good to venerate the crucifix. But even better than images of wood or stone are living images, souls formed in the image of Christ.
Edith Stein, St Teresa Benedicta of the Cross

Mary is God’s masterpiece. Have you ever walked into a museum where an artist was displaying his work? Can you imagine him being offended if you were viewing what he considered to be his masterpiece? Would he resent your looking at that instead of at him? ‘Hey, you should be looking at me!’ Rather, the artist would receive honor because of the attention you were giving his work. And Mary is God’s work, from beginning to end. — Scott Hahn (via askthecatholic)
signum-crucis:

Christ on the Cross between Mary and John — Hubert van Eyck, 1430
And see what He has done for us, and the end of His doing it all was to gain our love! We look upon a crucifix and it hardly moves us. We hear of His bitter Passion, but our eyes are dry, and our hearts indifferent. We kneel down to pray, but we can hardly keep our thoughts fixed upon Him for a quarter of an hour together. We go into His own most holy presence, and we hardly bend the knee before the Tabernacle, lest it should spoil our clothes. We see others sin, and what matter is it to us that Jesus is offended, so long as it is not we who are risking our souls by offending Him?
Oh, these are strange signs of love! Surely Jesus cannot be much to us, if this is the way we feel about Him. Yet so it is. We go our own way, and do our own will. The great thing is to please ourselves, and to make things easy to us. Life must be taught to run smooth. As to penance, it must be kept at arm’s length. We must have bodily comforts and worldly conveniences, and our spiritual life must be nothing but a sufficiency of those inward consolations, without which our souls give us pain, because they are not at rest. If we worship God, it is for self; if we do good to others, it is self we are seeking even in our good to others, it is self we are seeking even in our charity. Poor Jesus Christ! as S. Alphonso used to say, poor Jesus Christ! Who thinks of Him? who weds His interests?
—Frederick William Faber, All for Jesus or Easy Ways of Divine Love (1853)

signum-crucis:

Christ on the Cross between Mary and John — Hubert van Eyck, 1430

And see what He has done for us, and the end of His doing it all was to gain our love! We look upon a crucifix and it hardly moves us. We hear of His bitter Passion, but our eyes are dry, and our hearts indifferent. We kneel down to pray, but we can hardly keep our thoughts fixed upon Him for a quarter of an hour together. We go into His own most holy presence, and we hardly bend the knee before the Tabernacle, lest it should spoil our clothes. We see others sin, and what matter is it to us that Jesus is offended, so long as it is not we who are risking our souls by offending Him?

Oh, these are strange signs of love! Surely Jesus cannot be much to us, if this is the way we feel about Him. Yet so it is. We go our own way, and do our own will. The great thing is to please ourselves, and to make things easy to us. Life must be taught to run smooth. As to penance, it must be kept at arm’s length. We must have bodily comforts and worldly conveniences, and our spiritual life must be nothing but a sufficiency of those inward consolations, without which our souls give us pain, because they are not at rest. If we worship God, it is for self; if we do good to others, it is self we are seeking even in our good to others, it is self we are seeking even in our charity. Poor Jesus Christ! as S. Alphonso used to say, poor Jesus Christ! Who thinks of Him? who weds His interests?

—Frederick William Faber, All for Jesus or Easy Ways of Divine Love (1853)

signum-crucis:

The celebration of the Holy Mass is as valuable as the death of Jesus on the Cross.—St Thomas Aquinas
In Heaven Right NowWHAT I FOUND AT MY FIRST MASS
THERE I STOOD, a man incognito, a Protestant minister in plainclothes, slipping into the back of a Catholic chapel in Milwaukee to witness my first Mass. Curiosity had driven me there, and I still didn’t feel sure that it was healthy curiosity. Studying the writings of the earliest Christians, I’d found countless references to “the liturgy,” “the Eucharist,” “the sacrifice.” For those first Christians, the Bible—the book I loved above all—was incomprehensible apart from the event that today’s Catholics called “the Mass.”
…
Unsure of myself, I remained seated. For years, as an evangelical Calvinist, I’d been trained to believe that the Mass was the ultimate sacrilege a human could commit. The Mass, I had been taught, was a ritual that purported to “resacrifice Jesus Christ.” So I would remain an observer. I would stay seated, with my Bible open beside me.
SOAKED IN SCRIPTURE
As the Mass moved on, however, something hit me. My Bible wasn’t just beside me. It was before me—in the words of the Mass! One line was from Isaiah, another from the Psalms, another from Paul. The experience was overwhelming. I wanted to stop everything and shout, “Hey, can I explain what’s happening from Scripture? This is great!” Still, I maintained my observer status. I remained on the sidelines until I heard the priest pronounce the words of consecration: “This is My body… This is the cup of My blood.”
…
—The Lamb’s Supper: The Mass As Heaven On Earth by Dr Scott Hahn (former Presbyterian minister)
I am always amazed when I realize that many people satisfy themselves with merely reading the Bible when through the liturgy of the Church they could actually enter into the events of the Bible.—The Liturgical Year: A Celebration of Christ

signum-crucis:

The celebration of the Holy Mass is as valuable as the death of Jesus on the Cross.
—St Thomas Aquinas

In Heaven Right Now
WHAT I FOUND AT MY FIRST MASS

THERE I STOOD, a man incognito, a Protestant minister in plainclothes, slipping into the back of a Catholic chapel in Milwaukee to witness my first Mass. Curiosity had driven me there, and I still didn’t feel sure that it was healthy curiosity. Studying the writings of the earliest Christians, I’d found countless references to “the liturgy,” “the Eucharist,” “the sacrifice.” For those first Christians, the Bible—the book I loved above all—was incomprehensible apart from the event that today’s Catholics called “the Mass.”

Unsure of myself, I remained seated. For years, as an evangelical Calvinist, I’d been trained to believe that the Mass was the ultimate sacrilege a human could commit. The Mass, I had been taught, was a ritual that purported to “resacrifice Jesus Christ.” So I would remain an observer. I would stay seated, with my Bible open beside me.

SOAKED IN SCRIPTURE

As the Mass moved on, however, something hit me. My Bible wasn’t just beside me. It was before me—in the words of the Mass! One line was from Isaiah, another from the Psalms, another from Paul. The experience was overwhelming. I wanted to stop everything and shout, “Hey, can I explain what’s happening from Scripture? This is great!” Still, I maintained my observer status. I remained on the sidelines until I heard the priest pronounce the words of consecration: “This is My body… This is the cup of My blood.

The Lamb’s SupperThe Mass As Heaven On Earth by Dr Scott Hahn (former Presbyterian minister)

I am always amazed when I realize that many people satisfy themselves with merely reading the Bible when through the liturgy of the Church they could actually enter into the events of the Bible.
The Liturgical Year: A Celebration of Christ

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