goandannouce:

“Among the various supplications with which we successfully appeal to the Virgin Mother of God, the Holy Rosary without doubt occupies a special and distinct place. This prayer, which some call the Psalter of the Virgin or Breviary of the Gospel and of Christian life, was described and recommended by Our Predecessor of happy memory, Leo XIII”-Pope Pius XI

goandannouce:

“Among the various supplications with which we successfully appeal to the Virgin Mother of God, the Holy Rosary without doubt occupies a special and distinct place. This prayer, which some call the Psalter of the Virgin or Breviary of the Gospel and of Christian life, was described and recommended by Our Predecessor of happy memory, Leo XIII”
-Pope Pius XI

signum-crucis:

necspenecmetu:

Jacopo Palma il Giovane, The Flagellation, c. 1613

If you follow the will of God, you know that in spite of all the terrible things that happen to you, you will never lose a final refuge. You know that the foundation of the world is love, so that even when no human being can or will help you, you may go on, trusting in the One who loves you.
—Pope Benedict XVI

signum-crucis:

necspenecmetu:

Jacopo Palma il Giovane, The Flagellation, c. 1613

If you follow the will of God, you know that in spite of all the terrible things that happen to you, you will never lose a final refuge. You know that the foundation of the world is love, so that even when no human being can or will help you, you may go on, trusting in the One who loves you.

Pope Benedict XVI

Where Peter is, there must be the Church.
Ubi Petris, ibi ergo ecclesia.
Explanatio psalmi, St. Ambrose [x] (via badwolfcomplex)
signum-crucis:

God has become man. He has become a child. Thus he fulfills the great and mysterious promise to be Emmanuel: God-with-us. Now he is no longer unreachable for anybody. God is Emmanuel. By becoming a child, he offers us the possibility of being on familiar terms with Him…—Pope Benedict XVI
God is not the great unknown, whom we can but dimly conceive. We need not fear, as heathen do, that he might be capricious and bloodthirsty or too far away and too great to hear men. He is there, and we always know where we can find him, where he allows himself to be found and is waiting for us. Today this should once more sink into our hearts: God is near. God knows us. God is waiting for us in Jesus Christ in the Blessed Sacrament. Let us not leave Him waiting in vain!—Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, God is Near Us: The Eucharist, the Heart of Life

signum-crucis:

God has become man. He has become a child. Thus he fulfills the great and mysterious promise to be Emmanuel: God-with-us. Now he is no longer unreachable for anybody. God is Emmanuel. By becoming a child, he offers us the possibility of being on familiar terms with Him…
—Pope Benedict XVI

God is not the great unknown, whom we can but dimly conceive. We need not fear, as heathen do, that he might be capricious and bloodthirsty or too far away and too great to hear men. He is there, and we always know where we can find him, where he allows himself to be found and is waiting for us. Today this should once more sink into our hearts: God is near. God knows us. God is waiting for us in Jesus Christ in the Blessed Sacrament. Let us not leave Him waiting in vain!
—Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, God is Near Us: The Eucharist, the Heart of Life

signum-crucis:

…the message of the Cross has been entrusted to us, so that we can offer hope to the world. When we proclaim Christ crucified we are proclaiming not ourselves, but him. We are not offering our own wisdom to the world, nor are we claiming any merit of our own, but we are acting as channels for his wisdom, his love, his saving merits. We know that we are merely earthenware vessels, and yet, astonishingly, we have been chosen to be heralds of the saving truth that the world needs to hear. Let us never cease to marvel at the extraordinary grace that has been given to us, let us never cease to acknowledge our unworthiness, but at the same time let us always strive to become less unworthy of our noble calling, lest through our faults and failings we weaken the credibility of our witness.
—Pope Benedict XVIChurch of the Holy Cross, Nicosia, Cyprus

signum-crucis:

the message of the Cross has been entrusted to us, so that we can offer hope to the world. When we proclaim Christ crucified we are proclaiming not ourselves, but him. We are not offering our own wisdom to the world, nor are we claiming any merit of our own, but we are acting as channels for his wisdom, his love, his saving merits. We know that we are merely earthenware vessels, and yet, astonishingly, we have been chosen to be heralds of the saving truth that the world needs to hear. Let us never cease to marvel at the extraordinary grace that has been given to us, let us never cease to acknowledge our unworthiness, but at the same time let us always strive to become less unworthy of our noble calling, lest through our faults and failings we weaken the credibility of our witness.

—Pope Benedict XVI
Church of the Holy Cross, Nicosia, Cyprus

signum-crucis:

The true measure of humanity is essentially determined in relationship to suffering and to the sufferer.—Pope Benedict XVI, encyclical Spe Salvi: On Christian Hope

signum-crucis:

The true measure of humanity is essentially determined in relationship to suffering and to the sufferer.
—Pope Benedict XVI, encyclical Spe Salvi: On Christian Hope

signum-crucis:

“Believe” - Portrait of Pope John Paul II — Igor Babailov
Concluding his homily at Blessed John Paul’s beatification Mass last May, Pope Benedict paid a personal tribute to his predecessor’s “witness in suffering.”“The Lord gradually stripped him of everything,” Pope Benedict recalled, “yet he remained ever a ‘rock,’ as Christ desired. … In this way he lived out in an extraordinary way the vocation of every priest and bishop to become completely one with Jesus, whom he daily receives and offers in the Church.”

signum-crucis:

Believe” - Portrait of Pope John Paul IIIgor Babailov

Concluding his homily at Blessed John Paul’s beatification Mass last May, Pope Benedict paid a personal tribute to his predecessor’s “witness in suffering.
The Lord gradually stripped him of everything,” Pope Benedict recalled, “yet he remained ever a ‘rock,’ as Christ desired. … In this way he lived out in an extraordinary way the vocation of every priest and bishop to become completely one with Jesus, whom he daily receives and offers in the Church.

signum-crucis:

In living out the Gospel and in suffering for it, the Church, under the guidance of the apostolic preaching, has learned to understand the mystery of the Cross more and more, even though ultimately it is a mystery that defies analysis in terms of our rational formulae. The darkness and irrationality of sin and the holiness of God, too dazzling for our eyes, come together in the Cross, transcending our power of understanding. And yet in the message of the New Testament, and in the proof of that message in the lives of the saints, the great mystery has become radiant light.
—Pope Benedict XVI, Jesus of Nazareth

signum-crucis:

In living out the Gospel and in suffering for it, the Church, under the guidance of the apostolic preaching, has learned to understand the mystery of the Cross more and more, even though ultimately it is a mystery that defies analysis in terms of our rational formulae. The darkness and irrationality of sin and the holiness of God, too dazzling for our eyes, come together in the Cross, transcending our power of understanding. And yet in the message of the New Testament, and in the proof of that message in the lives of the saints, the great mystery has become radiant light.

—Pope Benedict XVI, Jesus of Nazareth

signum-crucis:

Fr Wojtyła asked Padre Pio which of his wounds caused the greatest suffering. The priest expected Padre Pio to say it was his chest wound, but instead the Padre replied, “It is my shoulder wound, which no one knows about and has never been cured or treated.”
Centuries earlier, Our Lord himself had revealed to St Bernard of Clairvaux in a vision, that his shoulder wound from carrying the heavy wooden cross caused him his greatest suffering, and that the cross tore into his flesh right up to the shoulder bone.
…
Padre Pio said this of his spiritual children: “When the Lord entrusts a soul to me, I place it on my shoulder and never let it go.” From this statement, it can reasonably be inferred that the saint offered up the suffering and the extreme pain of his shoulder wound for his spiritual children.

signum-crucis:

Fr Wojtyła asked Padre Pio which of his wounds caused the greatest suffering. The priest expected Padre Pio to say it was his chest wound, but instead the Padre replied, “It is my shoulder wound, which no one knows about and has never been cured or treated.”

Centuries earlier, Our Lord himself had revealed to St Bernard of Clairvaux in a vision, that his shoulder wound from carrying the heavy wooden cross caused him his greatest suffering, and that the cross tore into his flesh right up to the shoulder bone.

Padre Pio said this of his spiritual children: “When the Lord entrusts a soul to me, I place it on my shoulder and never let it go.” From this statement, it can reasonably be inferred that the saint offered up the suffering and the extreme pain of his shoulder wound for his spiritual children.

signum-crucis:

Crucifixion — Andrea da Firenze, 1365-68Basilica of Santa Maria Novella, Florence, Italy 
The cross is the most profound condescension of God to man and to what man — especially in difficult and painful moments — looks on as his unhappy destiny. The cross is like a touch of eternal love upon the most painful wounds of man’s earthly existence…—Pope John Paul II, encyclical Dives in misericordia

signum-crucis:

Crucifixion — Andrea da Firenze, 1365-68
Basilica of Santa Maria Novella, Florence, Italy 

The cross is the most profound condescension of God to man and to what man — especially in difficult and painful moments — looks on as his unhappy destiny. The cross is like a touch of eternal love upon the most painful wounds of man’s earthly existence…
—Pope John Paul II, encyclical Dives in misericordia

signum-crucis:

The Crucifixion — Carl Heinrich Bloch, 1870
The Cross because of what it represents is the most potent and universal symbol of the Christian faith. We revere the instrument by which Jesus Christ, Our Lord, saved us. Once understood as an object of scorn and shame, now the cross has become for us the sign of glory.
This is what Paul is talking about in the beautiful hymn he quotes in his letter to the Philippians… The state of Jesus was divine. “In the beginning was the Word and the Word was with God and the Word was God.” Yet Jesus “did not cling to his equality with God”. He did not insist on his status.  Instead, “he emptied himself” and took on the condition of a slave. God’s Son became like a slave, the lowest person in society of those times, a person who could be bought and sold in a public market and this slave had no rights or status. But there was more to come. Sharing our human nature, like us in everything but sin, he went to an even lower level, “accepting death” and not any death, but death on a cross, though totally innocent, dying as a convicted criminal. He gave up everything, life and good name and all human dignity. And all to show us how much God loves us, how much he himself loves us. No wonder that believers in other religions find it either totally incomprehensible or outrageously shocking and blasphemous that God should go through such an experience. Our faith, says St Paul, is offensive to the Jews [and, incidentally, also to Muslims] and nonsense to the Gentiles.—Fr Eugene Lobo SJ, Rome
†
Christ took the lowest place in the world—the Cross—and by this radical humility he redeemed us and constantly comes to our aid.—Pope Benedict XVI, encyclical Deus Caritas Est

signum-crucis:

The Crucifixion — Carl Heinrich Bloch, 1870

The Cross because of what it represents is the most potent and universal symbol of the Christian faith. We revere the instrument by which Jesus Christ, Our Lord, saved us. Once understood as an object of scorn and shame, now the cross has become for us the sign of glory.

This is what Paul is talking about in the beautiful hymn he quotes in his letter to the Philippians… The state of Jesus was divine. “In the beginning was the Word and the Word was with God and the Word was God.” Yet Jesus “did not cling to his equality with God”. He did not insist on his status.  Instead, “he emptied himself” and took on the condition of a slave. God’s Son became like a slave, the lowest person in society of those times, a person who could be bought and sold in a public market and this slave had no rights or status. But there was more to come. Sharing our human nature, like us in everything but sin, he went to an even lower level, “accepting death” and not any death, but death on a cross, though totally innocent, dying as a convicted criminal. He gave up everything, life and good name and all human dignity. And all to show us how much God loves us, how much he himself loves us. No wonder that believers in other religions find it either totally incomprehensible or outrageously shocking and blasphemous that God should go through such an experience. Our faith, says St Paul, is offensive to the Jews [and, incidentally, also to Muslims] and nonsense to the Gentiles.
—Fr Eugene Lobo SJ, Rome

Christ took the lowest place in the world—the Cross—and by this radical humility he redeemed us and constantly comes to our aid.
—Pope Benedict XVI, encyclical Deus Caritas Est

signum-crucis:

The Calvary — Hendrik Goltzius
Passover was celebrated at home. Jesus did this too. But after the meal he got up and went out, and he overstepped the bounds of the law by going beyond the Brook Kidron which marked the boundary of Jerusalem.
He went out into the night. He did not fear the chaos, did not hide from it, but plunged into its deepest point, into the jaws of death: as we pray, he “descended into hell”. Faith always means going out together with Jesus, not being afraid of the chaos, because he is the stronger one. He “went out” and we go out with him if we do the same.
Faith means emerging from the walls to build places of faith and of love in the midst of the chaotic world by the power of Jesus Christ. The Lord “went out” - it is a sign of his power. He went out into the night of Gethsemane, the night of the cross and the grave. He is the “stronger man” who stands up against the “strong man” — death.
The love of God — God’s power — is stronger than the powers of destruction. So this very “going out,” this setting out on the path of the Passion, when Jesus steps outside the boundary of the protective walls of the city, is a gesture of victory. The mystery of Gethsemane already holds within it the mystery of Easter joy. Jesus is the “stronger man.”
There is no power that can withstand him now; no place where he is not to be found. He summons us to dare to accompany him on his path; for where faith and love are, he is there, and the power of peace is there which overcomes nothingness and death.
BenedictusBenedict XVI

signum-crucis:

The Calvary — Hendrik Goltzius

Passover was celebrated at home. Jesus did this too. But after the meal he got up and went out, and he overstepped the bounds of the law by going beyond the Brook Kidron which marked the boundary of Jerusalem.

He went out into the night. He did not fear the chaos, did not hide from it, but plunged into its deepest point, into the jaws of death: as we pray, he “descended into hell”. Faith always means going out together with Jesus, not being afraid of the chaos, because he is the stronger one. He “went out” and we go out with him if we do the same.

Faith means emerging from the walls to build places of faith and of love in the midst of the chaotic world by the power of Jesus Christ. The Lord “went out” - it is a sign of his power. He went out into the night of Gethsemane, the night of the cross and the grave. He is the “stronger man” who stands up against the “strong man” — death.

The love of God — God’s power — is stronger than the powers of destruction. So this very “going out,” this setting out on the path of the Passion, when Jesus steps outside the boundary of the protective walls of the city, is a gesture of victory. The mystery of Gethsemane already holds within it the mystery of Easter joy. Jesus is the “stronger man.”

There is no power that can withstand him now; no place where he is not to be found. He summons us to dare to accompany him on his path; for where faith and love are, he is there, and the power of peace is there which overcomes nothingness and death.

Benedictus
Benedict XVI

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